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  • ivanildotrindade 3:12 am on July 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amazon, , , , mission trip,   

    Rambling from the Amazon 

    Hello everyone,

    This has been more than the typical busy summer that I have experienced typically over many years. First of all, my wife has been in Brazil with my son for over a month now. She is helping care for her mother, whose health is failing right now. She needs 24-7 care and my wife is in charge of the night shift. She hasn’t slept one single night since she got there and she is very exhausted right now.

    Secondly, I made an unexpected 10-day trip to SE Asia recently to represent our church at the dedication of one of the homes for orphans in Wiang Pa Pao, Thailand. While there, I also spent some time with the children and staff of the G.R.O.W. home and had meetings both in Cambodia and Thailand that were very useful for the future of this project to rescue children who are victims of physical and sexual exploitation.

    In a few hours I will be heading out to northern Brazil, leading a team from my church. We will be spending one week in and around some tributaries of the Amazon River, doing some work with children and adults. It will be a lot of hard work but also fun. Needless to say, I will have no Internet connection during that time.

    I will try to post some during the second part of our trip, when we will be in Macapa, the capital of the northern most state in Brazil, right on the Equator. We will be working with the local church my dad pastored for 55 years and I know I will be blessed to be there.

    Thank you for remembering us in your prayers. Please keep checking back. I will ramble a little here one way or the other…

    Ivanildo C. Trindade

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    • Beth 8:47 am on July 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Praying for you Ivanildo and your family. May God bless everything you touch and renew your wife as she helps others right now. I think it is so exciting to see what God has done with you all. Did you ever think you would be traveling around the world representing God in so many places, when you were such a young child in the Amazon? I can tell my students at school.–Hey, I know someone who grew up in the rainforest! How neat!

      • ivanildotrindade 8:52 am on July 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        thanks, beth. really appreciate it. i lived on the island of my birth until i was 7. never thought much of anything else during that time, except what kind of fish i was going to have for my next meal. since my dad was a fisherman, we had enough to eat, but with no sanitation, drinking contaminated water was eventually going to kill us. parasites and a simple cold could have wiped us out, but God had mercy on us. i am a “debtor.”

    • Bob & Linda 3:29 pm on July 4, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Dear Brother, Enjoy the fish. 🙂
      Didn’t think much about it when you were seven but can’t help but think what the next chapter in your life holds for you and the multitudes He allows you to touch. We pray that the team is safe and effective as you travel. Our blessings to Naza and your family there. We pray that her mother improves even while you are there. Blessings, B & L

  • ivanildotrindade 11:50 pm on May 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amazon, Amazon rainforest, , , most expensive cities, most populous cities, most populous countries, nile river, São Paulo, South America   

    ANSWERS TO BRAZIL QUIZ 

    TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF BRAZIL

    I. Multiple-choice:

    1. Brazil produces more cars than the following country:

    O U.S.

    O Great Britain

    O Mexico (Right answer)

    O Germany

    O China

    2. The currency of Brazil is called:

    O Real (Right Answer)

    O Cruzeiro

    O Cruzado

    O Riel

    O Pataca

    3. The following is something Brazil is NOT famous for:

    O Bypassing the giant drug companies to produce cheaper, generic AIDS medicine.

    O Giving to the world the classical composer Heitor Vila-Lobos.

    O Revolutionizing the music world by creating a new sound, “bossa nova.”

    O Producing famous soap operas, known as “telenovelas,” which are broadcast around the world.

    O Being the first country in South America to elect a female president. (Right Answer)

    4. Which country is NOT among the top 10 most populous in the world

    O China

    O Russia

    O Japan

    O India

    O Brazil

    Right answer: NONE. The top 10 are: 1. China 2. India 3. United States 4. Indonesia 5. Brazil (about 200 million) 6. Pakistan 7. Bangladesh 8. Nigeria 9. Russia 10. Japan.

    5. Which city is NOT among the top ten most expensive cities in the world for expats?

    O Tokyo, Japan

    O Moscow, Russia

    O N’Djamena, Chad

    O New York, U.S.A. (Right answer)

    O São Paulo, Brazil

    The top 10 are: 1. Luanda, Angola 2. Tokyo, Japan 3. N’Djamena, Chad 4. Moscow, Russia 5. Geneva, Switzerland 6. Osaka, Japan Zürich, Switzerland Singapore 9. Hong Kong 10. São Paulo, Brazil.

    II. True or False:

    1. Brazil is the 6th largest economy in the world, having surpassed the U.K. at the end of 2011 in terms of GDP.  True

    2. The Amazon basin covers some 60% of Brazil’s surface.  True

    3. São Paulo is the second most populous city in the world. Depending on how you count, it could either be True or False.

    4. 5% of the population in Brazil owns 85% of the country’s wealth.  True

    5. Outside of the G-8, more scientific papers from Brazil are quoted than from any other county.  True

    6. Brazil’s land area is bigger than that of Continental United States.  True, by 3.2 square miles.

    7. The Amazon represents over half of the world’s remaining rainforest.  True. 8.5 million square kilometers. Brazil has the largest reserves of tropical forest, freshwater, and bio-diversity in the world. 

    8. There are 200 nations within the country we call “Brazil.”  True

    9. The Amazon River is the longest river in the world.  False, according to most experts. The Nile is the longest. The Amazon is bigger in the volume of water and it is the widest — 5 miles in dry season, 15 miles during the flooded season. 

    10. The Amazon River is the largest river in the world in volume of water with an average discharge greater than the next seven rivers combined.  True. 60 million gallons poured into the Amazon every one second. Enough water flows out of the Amazon each day to keep NYC going for 12 years!

    11. More than one-third of all species in the world live in the Amazon rainforest.  True

    12. The current President of Brazil is the daughter of a Bulgarian immigrant.  True

    13. Cocoa, beef, sugar cane, coffee, orange juice are just a few examples of commodities that Brazil is the #1 producer in the world.  True. Brazil is also the main producer of iron ore, biofuels (bio-ethanol in particular). 

    14. Through Embraer, Brazil is the third largest aircraft manufacturer in the world.  True

    15. In spite of its great economic progress, Brazil is still ruled by a military dictatorship.  False

    And more: At least 80% of the developed world’s diet originated in the tropical forest. Examples: avocados, coconuts, figs, oranges, lemons, grapefruit, bananas, pineapples, mangos, tomatoes; vegetables, including potatoes, rice, corn, winter squash and yams; spices like black pepper, cayenne, chocolate, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, sugar cane, turmeric, coffee and vanilla; nuts, including Brazil nuts and cashews. 

    “Vincristine,” extracted from the rainforest plant Periwinkle, is one of the word’s most powerful anticancer drugs. 25% of active ingredients in today’s cancer-fighting drugs come from organisms only found in the rainforest.

    Winners will be announced tomorrow. Stay tuned!

    Ivanildo C. Trindade 

     
  • ivanildotrindade 10:04 pm on May 22, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amazon, amazon adventure, , brazil quiz, brazil world power, history of brazil,   

    TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF BRAZIL 

    I am leading a short-term mission trip to northern Brazil July 4-18. We will be on the Amazon,  baby! In preparation for this trip, I’ve put together this quiz for my team. I am giving you a chance to take this quiz and win a free copy of Jay Milbrandt’s new book Go and Do. Okay, here are the rules:1. Submit your answers via e-mail to me by Friday, 5:00 p.m. EST. itrindade@woostergrace.org.

    2. If you have already taken this test, don’t bother to take it again. :). “Amazon Adventure’s” team members!

    3. If your last name is Trindade, or was formerly Trindade, you’re automatically disqualified from taking the quiz. Lucas!

    4. You are not allowed to Google, Wiki, Bing or otherwise use the Internet to answer any of these questions, unless you use a Commodore 64 to surf the net.

    5. Include your mailing address with your answer. We will mail anywhere with an address written in Roman characters.

    Good luck!

    TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF BRAZIL

    I. Multiple-choice:

    1. Brazil produces more cars than the following country:

    O U.S.

    O Great Britain

    O Mexico

    O Germany

    O China

    2. The currency of Brazil is called:

    O Real

    O Cruzeiro

    O Cruzado

    O Riel

    O Pataca

    3. The following is something Brazil is NOT famous for:

    O Bypassing the giant drug companies to produce cheaper, generic AIDS medicine.

    O Giving to the world the classical composer Heitor Vila-Lobos.

    O Revolutionizing the music world by creating a new sound, “bossa nova.”

    O Producing famous soap operas, known as “telenovelas,” which are broadcast around the world.

    O Being the first country in South America to elect a female president.

    4. Which country is NOT among the top 10 most populous in the world

    O China

    O Russia

    O Japan

    O India

    O Brazil

    5. Which city is NOT among the top ten most expensive cities in the world for expats?

    O Tokyo, Japan

    O Moscow, Russia

    O N’Djamena, Chad

    O New York, U.S.A.

    O Sao Paulo, Brazil

    II. True or False:

    1. Brazil is the 6th largest economy in the world, having surpassed the U.K. at the end of 2011 in terms of GDP.  T       F

    2. The Amazon basin covers some 60% of Brazil’s surface.  T       F

    3. Sao Paulo is the second most populous city in the world.  T       F

    4. 5% of the population in Brazil owns 85% of the country’s wealth.  T       F

    5. Outside of the G-8, more scientific papers from Brazil are quoted than from any other county.  T       F

    6. Brazil’s land area is bigger than that of Continental United States.  T       F

    7. The Amazon represents over half of the world’s remaining rainforest.  T       F

    8. There are 200 nations within the country we call “Brazil.”  T       F

    9. The Amazon River is the longest river in the world.  T       F

    10. The Amazon River is the largest river in the world in volume of water with an average discharge greater than the next seven rivers combined.  T       F

    11. More than one-third of all species in the world live in the Amazon rainforest.  T       F

    12. The current President of Brazil is the daughter of a Bulgarian immigrant.  T       F

    13. Cocoa, beef, sugar cane, coffee, orange juice are just a few examples of commodities that Brazil is the #1 producer in the world.  T       F

    14. Through Embraer, Brazil is the third largest aircraft manufacturer in the world.  T       F

    15. In spite of its great economic progress, Brazil is still ruled by a military dictatorship.  T       F

    Ivanildo C. Trindade

     
  • ivanildotrindade 12:18 am on October 23, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amazon, amazon bill, gospel, great soccer player, parasite medicine,   

    How parasite medicine saved me 

    I wasn’t there, but I am told that before I was born, my dad had two wishes — first, that my mom would have a boy; secondly, that he would be a great soccer player. Now think about the variants here: a girl with no soccer skills, a girl who would be great at the game, a boy who was a soccer genius or one who couldn’t even play goalie.  Obviously, my dad got the last variant, which is not bad, considering the law of statistics, though I have to say I wasn’t that bad, but certainly not “great.”

    If God had wanted me to make my fortunes in the “beautiful game,” He would have sent a soccer coach into my little hut on the Amazon. Instead, he sent us an American who perhaps had not even seen a soccer ball in his life. The man used to go up and down the many tributaries of the Amazon, sharing Christ with some of the “least of these,” because, as he told me the story, during World War II, he was scared that the Germans might sink the ship where he was serving, so he promised God that, if he survived the war, he would dedicate his life to share the good news of Christ with people who lived in remote villages like the ones he had just seen somewhere in the world.

    And whoever heard of someone keeping a promise that was made under duress at a time when you feared for your life? I guess even God might give you a homework pass on that one. But not Bill Burk, self-nicknamed “Amazon Bill.” He and his new bride went to Brazil and their calender had a date with a poor fisherman and his wife, and that encounter would change our lives forever. Bill brought my dad to Christ.

    Once my dad accepted Christ, he was a radically changed man. He began to study with Bill and later through radio correspondence courses, in order to learn more about the Bible so he could share the good news with other people. With time, he was preaching everywhere on the islands. He went from catching smelly fish to catching messy people. (Sometimes they smelled too…). My father has always been a lover of people and no effort was spared when it came to sharing with the islanders — even paddling his little dug-out canoe multiple hours to get to a site where people had never heard of Jesus.

    But that’s not the reason I am telling you this story. I told you about a monumental event in my life. That event was my dad’s coming to faith in Christ. That action has had amazing repercussions in my life and that of my extended family to this day. But the most remarkable thing is that when Bill share the good news with my father, the gospel not only saved us, the gospel SAVED us.

    Every month Bill would come to our little hut on the Amazon and bring two things — a Bible, which he faithfully shared with my dad; and a package that he gave to my mom. What was in the package? Vitamins and parasite medicine. That package saved our lives. Yes, the gospel saved us from eternal doom, but parasite medicine saved us from the doom of the earth. Without Bill’s magic pills, my siblings and I had a good chance of dying before we reached the age of 5. In fact, as I said before, I did have siblings who died before I was born, and my little sister, Marta, died when she was only 2, from chicken pox.

    Bill, mind you, was not preaching a “social gospel,” he was simply being compassionate toward other people, like the Lord commanded him to be. Billions of dollars have been spent in “world missions”  throughout the history of the church, but sometimes all it takes is a few cents to buy the malaria or parasite medicine needed to save lives. I hope you will get up from the couch and find someone to give a package to. Don’t ask me what should be in that package. You go and figure it out.

    Ivanildo C. Trindade

     
    • Beth 6:02 am on October 25, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      I love this story of your times in the jungle, how God came to preserve your family and have shared it on a number of occasions with other people.

  • ivanildotrindade 11:05 pm on October 21, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: amazon, , immigrant, island on the amazon, , , paradise and hell, parasites, poor widows, small pox   

    Paradise and Hell on the Amazon 

    What do you tell people when they suggest that you are too passionate about a certain issue? “You are too emotionally attached to this!” “Don’t let your emotions get the best of you!” “You are a single issue person.” I find these comments so condescending. I mean, I don’t go around telling people, “You are as emotional as a corpse!” Sorry, corpse.

    Some people tell me this kind of stuff when they see my passion for helping the disadvantaged. If they are Christians, it should be a non-issue. The Bible has 2003 references to the poor and most of them are admonitions on how we should treat them. The so-called “quartet of the vulnerable” — the orphans, the widows, the poor and the immigrants, jump at us from multiple pages of  Scriptures.

    As far as I am concerned, as a follower of Jesus Christ, there is no “exception clause” freeing me from serving the “least of these.” It is not an option; it is not a “nice” thing to do. It is part and parcel of what I must naturally do if I indeed want to demonstrate that Jesus is my Master. It should be as natural as walking on two feet is to humans.

    But the Scriptural argument, often, is not enough to convince even the most devout of Christians. The more conservative they are, tragically, the more inclined they are to say that we should only help the “deserving” poor (whatever that means) or the ones who don’t have a cell phone, a flat screen T.V.’s or, God forbid, mountains of mountain dew piled on their kitchen floor.

    So I have to appeal to their emotion… I am, after all, an emotional guy, remember? I tell them about walking in the middle of a village of Pygmies in the Central African Republic, where the orange hair, the bloated belly and the sunken eyes of the children told a tale of death and destruction. Then I tell them that I was once one of those children. Now I have them.

    But this is not just a gimmick. I was, indeed, born into a family of thirteen, in a poor village of fishermen on a tiny island of the Amazon. Our hut was built on stilts, thatch roof, a hole for a window, the river for toilet and bathroom, and nothing but seafood and tropical fruits for food. It was hell and paradise all in one place, but we didn’t know it.

    Since there was food, we weren’t starving, but we were sick. We would go out into the wood to care for our needs and the stuff would run into the same water we used for drinking and bathing. This was, in essence, the same thing that was killing the precious Pygmies of Central Africa, with one big difference — I had food and they didn’t.

    We had no school, no hospital, and the next city was over two hours away by boat. If you had a serious accident, even if you had the means to get to the city, you would more than likely die on the way. We were forgotten by the world and awaiting a certain death by malaria, small pox, diarrhea or simply by stomach complications caused in by parasites.

    Actually, three of my siblings did pass away before I was born, and if it had not been for an event that changed the history of my family, I would more than likely not be here telling you this story today.

    Tomorrow I will tell you what that event was.

    Ivanildo C. Trindade

     
    • ivanildotrindade 11:21 am on October 23, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      From my friend, Jim Hocking, CEO, ICDI (Jim receives my blog posts via e-mail, since he is a man on the move, so he doesn’t have a chance to come to this site often):

      Greetings Ivanildo,

      I just want you to know that I have been reading your blogs…you are an amazing writer!

      I did not grow up in the situation that you did but I did grow up in Africa and I am an emotional guy…that is why I do what I do. That is also why I get myself into so much trouble! Anyway…the exact words you used in this article…”you are just too emotional” have been used on me many times…

      Wow our Savior is awesome!

      Thanks for your blogs…the one today certainly struck a cord with me but then many of them have….keep it up and I will continue to send people your way to read these blogs.

      Jim

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